Other writing (Page 17)

I was never in the military, but my father was. He joined the British Navy when he was twenty. Sailing the high seas was not a new thing for him. He already had his sea legs, having spent a couple of years working as a cabin steward on ocean liners travelling from Southampton to New York, South Africa and  Australia. He had his 20th birthday on May 4 1939. It wasn’t difficult to see that the world was gearing up for another war. My dad, Seajay, often told us that the First World War came to an end because the belligerent countries ran out of troops toRead More →

Note: The Friends of the Guelph Public Library is still searching for a location to hold the 2018 book sale. If you can help, leave a message for Virginia Gillham in the comment section. (26 October 2016) – For ten years, the Friends of the Guelph Public Library has been raising money for our best friend, the Guelph Public Library. We haven’t stopped yet, and don’t intend to. So far we are over half a million dollars to the good. All of it has come from selling books, most of them at two or three dollars each. For the first one in 2007 we rentedRead More →

I am the only person I know who has achieved a trifecta in beer games. I had a perfect hand in cribbage, shot a hole in one in golf and threw a ton-eighty in darts. I know people who have achieved one or another of these. I even know people who have shot more than one 180 on the same darts night. But no one who has done all three. And each of them I’ve only ever done once. A perfect hand in cribbage comes when you have been dealt three fives, the jack of the off-suit and two other cards. You discard the twoRead More →

If you think I don’t know what I’m talking about when it comes to music, I’ll tell you this much: I have performed live in front of a packed house, as one half of a piano duet. My younger brother was the other half. Two people at one piano equals four hands on 88 keys. Sixteen fingers and four thumbs responsible for 4.4 keys each. Simple. What could go wrong? Nothing, and nothing did. In a faraway England, sixty years distant by now, there was one thing most families, rich and poor, had in common. It cut across the severe class divide that kept us allRead More →